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AMAN WISDOM: MEDITATIONS

In these times more than ever, we need to find solace in our homes and encourage our minds to open up to peace. When spiritual practitioners share their secrets to finding serenity in meditation, often they appeal to us to compassionately switch off our conscious minds and follow the path of intuition. To acknowledge feelings, without dwelling on thoughts. Much as we look to the sky and watch the clouds come and go, form and fade, so do our thoughts pass, fleeting and ethereal. We can choose to let them go. 

 
Thank you for your enquiry

An Aman representative will contact you shortly.

Our Central Reservations team is also available via phone 24 hours a day, 7 days a week:

Tel: (65) 6715 8855 (Singapore)

Tel: (1) 754 216 7830 (USA)

 
 

The power of breath

Geshe YongDong teaches that pausing to consider the breath slows us down and helps us assume control of emotions. Focused on our breathing, we become more aware of the transience of feelings. Instead of fast, shallow or out-of-control breaths, developing slow, mindful breathing links the breath with the mind and reduces the likelihood of being triggered by stress and negative emotions. Following the Buddhist tradition, Tsa Lung breath exercises can relax the body, and tune the mind into the present moment, promoting inner peace.

The healing power of sunrise

Waking up early to appreciate the sunrise and taking the time to reflect on what we can be grateful for is often the simplest, most effective tonic. The ambrosial time before dawn – the hours before sunrise – is considered the prime time for practising meditation in the Sikh tradition.

This precious period when the new day is still in darkness – Amrit Velā – is naturally conducive to mindfulness and can be the clearest window to discovering peace, says David Melladew, Amanyara’s resident master in Traditional Oriental Medicine: ‘Many Eastern philosophies recognise 3am to 5am as the time of day that the lungs are strongest and most effective at their job of circulating energy through the body. Meditation at this time maximises the power and efficacy of the breath to balance Qi.’


 

Navajo cleansing smoke

Smudging is a healing tradition of the Navajo, an ancient spiritual ritual to cleanse a space in order to invite in the flow of positive energy. As taught by the Navajo elders at Amangiri in the deserts of Utah, burning sage drives out bad feelings and negative energy. Cedar branches are brushed in the air to bless a house, and sweetgrass is burned after sage or cedar to bring in the good spirits and send prayers up through the smoke. At home, light the sage, sweetgrass or cedar just enough for it to begin to smoke, and fan the smoke in the direction to be cleansed, moving from room to room. To perform the smudging ritual on either the self or someone else, fan the smoke over the entire body while standing or laying down.

Ayurvedic wisdom for daily wellbeing

Dr Shreekanth Nair, the resident Ayurvedic practitioner at Amanbagh, Rajasthan, draws on India’s ancient system of preventative medicine to offer five tips to staying healthy at home.

  • Sip warm water boiled with cumin seeds during meals to aid digestion and prevent bloating. Throughout the day, hot water boiled with ginger can keep the metabolism moving and the system hydrated.
 
  • Make a turmeric latté by blending a heaped teaspoon with a fat such as ghee or coconut oil, a pinch of pepper, hot water and milk, or blend it with herbal tea. The curcumin in turmeric is anti-inflammatory and it contains a natural antihistamine that can help open the airways.
 
  • Sipping honey may be tempting to treat a dry cough, but in Ayurveda, it is considered dehydrating, with the potential to make wheezing worse. To address this, add ghee to the honey before drinking.
 
  • Avoid alcohol: as tempting as it may be to have a glass of something to relax the nervous system, alcoholic drinks are believed to compromise immunity and the balance of digestive flora.
 
  • Fasting after 5pm can be a good way to preserve energy for those of us spending a lot more of our time at home during the day. Digestion demands a lot of energy; fasting can help us conserve battery power to stay healthy or facilitate healing. 

A consolation from solitude

Time alone can be an opportunity to find inner strength and pursue personal growth. Daily self-care rituals such as bathing can bring the small moments in life into sharper focus, allowing us to honour our emotions while tending to our physical wellbeing. Added to a bath, aromatherapy and detoxifying salts help soak away stresses and banish dry, tired skin while promoting emotional stability and an overall sense of wellness. At Amankora Gangtey, a candle-lit stone hut on a hill houses a wooden tub filled with water and Bhutan’s revered khempa herb. Hot stones are dropped into the water, releasing therapeutic minerals as it heats.
Gangtey Valley may be off the travel agenda for now, but Amankora’s spa manager Sonia Banuls Rovira recommends looking to the Aman Skincare range of natural healing blends to create spa-worthy bathing rituals at home. The Grounding Bath ritual combines Amethyst Bath and Shower Oil with Himalayan Salts to rejuvenate, relax, and centre the mind. The Purifying Bath pairs Auric Cleanse Bath Salts and Quartz Scrub and Soak to release blocked energy and ease muscle tension. In the Nourishing Bath, Coconut Milk Bath and Jade Scrub and Soak come together to nurture and revive body and soul.
 

You can't calm the storm, so stop trying. What you can do is calm yourself. The storm will pass.

Timber Hawkeye